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Creative Solutions: 100-Bed Van Nuys Bridge Shelter

Join Hope of the Valley Founder and CEO, Ken Craft on a guided tour of this one of a kind shelter. 

Many homeless men, women and children have no place to go as they await placement in permanent housing. The 100-Bed Van Nuys Bridge Housing Shelter provides a bridge between the streets and permanent housing. While at the shelter clients are connected with vital services to address underlying issues that may prevent them from holding a job or finding permanent housing, including mental heath services, substance abuse recovery, job training etc. . . The Van Nuys shelter is a state-of-the-art facility and represents one of the many creative ways Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission and the city of LA is solving the homeless crisis. 

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

How The Homeless Are Housed

LA Mayor, Eric Garcetti & Hope of the Valley CEO/Founder, Ken Craft talk about how homeless men, women and children get placed in permanent housing.

 With nearly 100,000 homeless men, women and children in LA County, the homeless problem is visible and real. And it’s growing—by nearly 17% per year (according to the 2019 Homeless Count). For the last 10 years Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission has been providing programs and services to help prevent and eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessness throughout San Fernando Valley and Los Angeles County. Through our efforts the number of new people on the streets grew by less than half that of the the LA County Average. At 8% it is the lowest in Los Angeles County. That means, there are half as many people on the streets as there would have been without our work. We want that growth to not only be zero, but to be reversed. We attribute this success to our approach to housing homeless men, women and children. Hear LA Mayor , Eric Garcetti and CEO/Founder of Hope of the Valley, Ken Craft, talk about this approach.

How the Homeless Are Housed Infographic

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Councilman Paul Krekorian Shares Vision for 100-Bed NoHo Bridge Housing Shelter

Councilman, Paul Krekorian and Hope of the Valley CEO/Founder Ken Craft share how this Partnership is Changing Lives

The beautiful new 15,000-square foot facility in North Hollywood will provide transitional shelter for men and women who are currently living unhoused throughout San Fernando Valley and LA County.Behind the walls of the building, mattress beds equipped with their own nightstands and storage cubbies, bathrooms with curtained-off shower stalls, and three meals a day will await 85 people looking for a new start. We expect to help find permanent housing for over 400 each year through this facility. The site is designed to temporarily house people that are currently living on the streets until such as time as we are able to place them in permanent housing.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

Jeopardy Host, Alex Trebek Challenges Society’s View of Homelessness at NoHo Bridge Housing Grand Opening

Trebek Challenges Those Who Can to Lend a Hand to Those in Need: Give $500,000 to Shelter Project

“I’m not one of those NIMBYs,” the longtime “Jeopardy!” host said. “I’m not one of those people who thinks that we can’t deal with the homeless near my house because that’s bad. I don’t feel that way. I wish more people would react in a positive way to reaching out and trying to help their fellow member of the community.”

The Alex and Jean Trebek Community Room is the centerpiece of the San Fernando Valley’s first A Bridge Home facility.

The North Hollywood facility will temporarily house 25 women and 60 men and their pets. The Trebeks donated $100,000 to this facility and another $500,000 to Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission for another shelter that will open in 2021.

The facility helps the homeless “become folks who we know are human beings and can feel that humanity again,” Mayor Eric Garcetti said.

“And the goal of A Bridge Home was very simple – to put A Bridge Home shelter in every one of LA’s 15 council districts and deliver the services they need to save their lives now,” said Garcetti.

The Trebeks believe that the homeless are just ordinary people who have had bad circumstances happen to them and deserve a helping hand, not judgment.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

San Fernando Valley Homelessness is Lowest in LA County

10 – Years of Success: How Hope of the  Valley is Preventing, Reducing and Eliminating Poverty, Hunger and Homelessness in the San Fernando Valley 

With nearly 100,000 homeless men, women and children in LA County, the homeless problem is visible and real. And it’s growing—by nearly 17% per year (according to the 2019 Homeless Count). For the last 10 years Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission has been providing programs and services to help prevent and eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessness throughout San Fernando Valley and Los Angeles County. Through our efforts the number of new people on the streets grew by less than half that of the the LA County Average. At 8% it is the lowest in Los Angeles County. That means, there are half as many people on the streets as there would have been without our work. We want that growth to not only be zero, but to be reversed.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

Los Angeles Daily News & More: NoHo Navigation Center, First Step to Housing

Bathrooms during the opening of the City of Los Angeles’ first Homeless Navigation Center in North Hollywood, Thursday, February 20, 2020. The center will offer 120 storage bins, showers, and access to service providers to assist with housing for homeless people. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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Considered the first step in a journey to becoming housed again, a new center that includes showers, bathrooms and storage bins will be available for homeless people in North Hollywood early next month.

As the city inches closer to opening more shelters and affordable housing in the San Fernando Valley, the new $5.7 million facility at 11839 Sherman Way, near Lankershim Boulevard, will serve as a “navigation center,” a starting point to getting sheltered, employed and eventually housed.

The facility is being billed by elected officials as the first of its kind in the city. But it took significant convincing over the past few years to get it built.

“Over the years I’ve had people tell me that this isn’t a solution, that the problem is much bigger than this, and that this is just a band-aid,” said Laurie Craft of Hope of Valley, the operator of the facility. But Craft said that even a band-aid serves a purpose — to “facilitate and promote healing” and to prevent people from deteriorating into even worse condition.

NoHo Neighborhood Council: Homeless Navigation Center Opens for Community

Published by the North Hollywood North East Neighborhood Council on February 26, 2020.

February 20, 2020 on Sherman Way near Lankershim, we achieved another milestone in the effort to reduce homelessness across the northeast San Fernando Valley.

Councilmember Krekorian is proud to announce his work to procure a homeless navigation center in CD2 has come to fruition. A place where people experiencing homelessness could store their belongings, use the facilities, take a shower, and have immediate access to housing placement professionals.

Funding was obtained from three sources, including Measure HHH, to cover costs of the center.

Greater Valley Glen Council: Homeless Navigation Center Needs Donations

Published by the Greater Valley Glen Council on April 17, 2020

North Hollywood – When the Homeless Navigation Center on Sherman Way near Lankershim had its formal launch in late February, few would have imagined how the world would change just a few weeks later. Still, for the people it serves, the Center, first of its kind in Los Angeles, could not have opened at a more opportune time.

The Center, which has 120 storage bins, shower facilities, restrooms, and onsite staff to assist clients with various services, is operated by Hope of the Valley. Laurie Craft, the organization’s Director of Access and Engagement, said the North Hollywood facility is on a daily basis receiving 40 to 50 people from across the San Fernando Valley. This group includes recently displaced students who are now experiencing homelessness.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.