Skateland: Making Homeless History in San Fernando Valley

Better Together: Addressing Homelessness in Los Angeles Through Corporate Partnerships

Beachbody: More Than a Corporate Sponsor

With nearly 100,000 homeless men, women and children in LA County, the homeless problem is visible and real. And it’s growing—by nearly 17% per year (according to the 2019 Homeless Count). For the last 10 years Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission has been providing programs and services to help prevent and eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessness throughout San Fernando Valley and Los Angeles County. Through our efforts the number of new people on the streets grew by less than half that of the the LA County Average. At 8% it is the lowest in Los Angeles County. That means, there are half as many people on the streets as there would have been without our work. We want that growth to not only be zero, but to be reversed. A good measure of our success is due to an approach that works in partnership with other organizations. We don’t think this a problem any one agency, group, city, county or state government, or charity can solve on its own.

More than sponsors . . . 

Our corporate partnerships are more than sponsors. They understand that solving homelessness will require more than writing a check or underwriting programs. The biggest problems require the best minds to create the best strategies to marshal the resources we have to create innovative and effective solutions. It means tapping into the things that make successful corporations effective.

We think that this has been best represented in our partnership with Beachbody and Beachbody foundation. When over $200,000 dollars was needed to break ground on an 85-Bed Shelter they responded with the down payment and Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission opened the first bridge housing shelter in North Hollywood. It will help nearly 900 homeless, men women and children find permanent housing each year. They have been critical partners in sponsoring events like the Annual Drumstick Dash which raises money to provide over 200,000 hot meals throughout the year.

(Picture: Left–Carl Daikler, CEO and Founder, Beachbody with Ken Craft, Founder/CEO, Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission at newly opened 85-bed NoHo Bridge Shelter)

Employee Driven Initiatives

Currently an employee led team has created a donation based 5k Virtual Run (30-Day Breakaway Virtual 5K) where all proceeds go to homeless services run by Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission. The leadership of Beachbody foundation responded to this employee led effort by committing to match all donations up to $500,000. We believe the secret to our partnership is not only a very generous leadership and corporate culture, but the enthusiasm of employee led teams with participants from every level of the organization.

Through an entirely volunteer driven steering team, Beachbody Employees have:

  • produced live events to create awareness of the homeless problem with over 500+ employees and over 100 fitness trainers with a combined followership in the millions.

  • sent volunteer teams to help in Hope of the Valley programs.

  • provided vital health and fitness programs to shelter residents. Including visit by top trainers and coaches who have offered encouragement and support to our clients.

  • Coordinated “think tanks” with their top teams in Legal, finance, marketing and event planning to share market best practices and expertise.

Become More Than A Sponsor!

Contact us HERE to learn more about becoming a corporate partner that makes a difference in our community.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

Hope of the Valley Featured by Wiki.ezvid.com

Councilman Paul Krekorian Shares Vision for 100-Bed NoHo Bridge Housing Shelter

Councilman, Paul Krekorian and Hope of the Valley CEO/Founder Ken Craft share how this Partnership is Changing Lives

The beautiful new 15,000-square foot facility in North Hollywood will provide transitional shelter for men and women who are currently living unhoused throughout San Fernando Valley and LA County.Behind the walls of the building, mattress beds equipped with their own nightstands and storage cubbies, bathrooms with curtained-off shower stalls, and three meals a day will await 85 people looking for a new start. We expect to help find permanent housing for over 400 each year through this facility. The site is designed to temporarily house people that are currently living on the streets until such as time as we are able to place them in permanent housing.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

Jeopardy Host, Alex Trebek Challenges Society’s View of Homelessness at NoHo Bridge Housing Grand Opening

Trebek Challenges Those Who Can to Lend a Hand to Those in Need: Give $500,000 to Shelter Project

“I’m not one of those NIMBYs,” the longtime “Jeopardy!” host said. “I’m not one of those people who thinks that we can’t deal with the homeless near my house because that’s bad. I don’t feel that way. I wish more people would react in a positive way to reaching out and trying to help their fellow member of the community.”

The Alex and Jean Trebek Community Room is the centerpiece of the San Fernando Valley’s first A Bridge Home facility.

The North Hollywood facility will temporarily house 25 women and 60 men and their pets. The Trebeks donated $100,000 to this facility and another $500,000 to Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission for another shelter that will open in 2021.

The facility helps the homeless “become folks who we know are human beings and can feel that humanity again,” Mayor Eric Garcetti said.

“And the goal of A Bridge Home was very simple – to put A Bridge Home shelter in every one of LA’s 15 council districts and deliver the services they need to save their lives now,” said Garcetti.

The Trebeks believe that the homeless are just ordinary people who have had bad circumstances happen to them and deserve a helping hand, not judgment.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

Community Room at North Hollywood homeless shelter named for Alex and Jean Trebek

Longtime “Jeopardy!” host Alex Trebek and his wife Jean have made contributions to local homeless shelters and on Thursday the community room at a new North Hollywood facility was named for them.

NORTH HOLLYWOOD, LOS ANGELES (Excerpted from KABC article,Tuesday, July 7, 2020 12:48PM) — San Fernando Valley residents for over 30 years, Alex and Jean Trebek have witnessed the growing homeless crisis firsthand. Now they’re giving back to their community in a big way.

“I’m not one of those NIMBYs,” the longtime “Jeopardy!” host said. “I’m not one of those people who thinks that we can’t deal with the homeless near my house because that’s bad. I don’t feel that way. I wish more people would react in a positive way to reaching out and trying to help their fellow member of the community.”

The Alex and Jean Trebek Community Room is the centerpiece of the San Fernando Valley’s first A Bridge Home facility.

The North Hollywood facility will temporarily house 25 women and 60 men and their pets. The Trebeks donated $100,000 to this facility and another $500,000 to Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission for another shelter that will open in 2021.

The facility helps the homeless “become folks who we know are human beings and can feel that humanity again,” Mayor Eric Garcetti said.

“And the goal of A Bridge Home was very simple – to put A Bridge Home shelter in every one of LA’s 15 council districts and deliver the services they need to save their lives now,” said Garcetti.

The Trebeks believe that the homeless are just ordinary people who have had bad circumstances happen to them and deserve a helping hand, not judgment.

“I was delighted to come out here today because it’s so important to Los Angeles and in particular, the Valley. As I pointed out, Jean and I are Valley people,” said Trebek.

An additional A Bridge Home facility will open in Sylmar on Friday and another will open in Van Nuys in August, 2020.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

Los Angeles Daily News: Sheltering the Homeless, New NoHo Bridge Shelter

Ken Craft, of Hope of the Valley, shows on Monday, July 6, 2020 Hope of the Valley’s NoHo Shelter, an 85-bed Bridge Housing shelter set to open this week inside a North Hollywood warehouse. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

PUBLISHED:  | UPDATED: 

A placard printed with the word “hope” went up this month on a nondescript manufacturing building, tucked at the end of a long driveway on an industrial road in North Hollywood.

The sign is one hint that in less than a week’s time, a 24-7 homeless shelter will open its doors in the San Fernando Valley, where before there had only been one such year-round shelter.

Partly visible from the road, at 13160 Raymer St., the sign reads “Hope of the Valley” on closer inspection, revealing the name of the nonprofit tasked with operating the shelter.

Behind the walls of the building, mattress beds equipped with their own nightstands and storage cubbies, bathrooms with curtained-off shower stalls, and three meals a day will await 85 people looking for a new start, as early as Thursday.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

Hope of the Valley in the News: New NoHo 85-Bed Bridge Housing Shelter

TMZ Breaking News: Alex Trebek–$500K to Combat Homeless Crisis

If you would like to join Alex in solving the Homeless Crisis in Los Angeles support Hope of the Valley. GIVE NOW

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.

San Fernando Valley Homelessness is Lowest in LA County

10 – Years of Success: How Hope of the  Valley is Preventing, Reducing and Eliminating Poverty, Hunger and Homelessness in the San Fernando Valley 

With nearly 100,000 homeless men, women and children in LA County, the homeless problem is visible and real. And it’s growing—by nearly 17% per year (according to the 2019 Homeless Count). For the last 10 years Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission has been providing programs and services to help prevent and eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessness throughout San Fernando Valley and Los Angeles County. Through our efforts the number of new people on the streets grew by less than half that of the the LA County Average. At 8% it is the lowest in Los Angeles County. That means, there are half as many people on the streets as there would have been without our work. We want that growth to not only be zero, but to be reversed.

Help us eliminate poverty, hunger and homelessess.